Research

Research is an essential role of the Section of Endocrine Surgery. Our faculty have made major contributions to the advancement of diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, including the T3 suppression test, classification of thyroid tumors, classification of Graves' ophthalmopathy, development of fine needle and coarse needle biopsies in the United States, and the development of the thyroglobulin assay. Our faculty are dedicated to being pioneers in the field of thyroid disease, and continually make progress with their ongoing clinical and basic science projects.

Adrenal

Symplicity HTN-3 Trial

Lead Investigator: Jai Radhakrishnan, MD
Coordinator: Joyce Thomas 212.342.3480; Kate Dalton 347.514.3366
Section: Division of Cardiology
Description: The Symplicity HTN-3 Trial is investigating the use of transcatheter therapies for patients with difficult to control hypertension. The purpose of this study is to provide additional information about a medical device intended to help treat high blood pressure in people whose blood pressure is not controlled despite treatment with multiple blood pressure medications. If you are interested, please contact our Study Coordinator or visit http://www.symplifybptrial.com/ for more information.

Parathyroid

Randomized Controlled Trial of Vitamin D Repletion Regimens in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

Lead Investigator: Shonni Joy Silverberg, MD
Coordinator: Anna Kepley
Contact: 212.342.5231; alk2186@columbia.edu
Description: Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a condition characterized by overactivity of the parathyroid glands leading to elevated parathyroid hormone and blood calcium levels. Other affected organs include the skeleton (calcium loss leads to a "weakening" of the skeleton), and the kidneys (high blood calcium can lead to kidney stones). Many patients with mild PHPT also have low levels of vitamin D. Both PHPT and Vitamin D Deficiency weaken the skeleton. Recent medical guidelines recommend treating patients with PHPT and low Vitamin D levels with Vitamin D. Treatment with Vitamin D is particularly important in PHPT patients undergoing surgery to prevent postsurgical complications, such as a low blood calcium. This study is designed to determine how vitamin D should be replaced in patients with PHPT and low vitamin D. If you are interested in finding out more information, please contact our Study Coordinator.

Bone Quality in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

Section: Metabolic Bone Disease Unit (Division of Endocrinology)
Lead Investigator: John Bilezikian, MD
Coordinator: Julia Udesky
Contact: 212.305.2900
Section: Metabolic Bone Disease Unit (Division of Endocrinology)
Description: This research study aims to collect information about bone quality in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Patients with primary hyperparathyroidism have been found to have low bone mass at certain skeletal sites, particularly the cortical bone, found in the forearm. The goal of this study is to learn how primary hyperparathyroidism affects different bone compartments by using the new ultra-high resolution Xtreme CT scanner for bone imaging, and to compare these results with standard bone density testing.

There are 2 parts to this study:

PART A: For this study, adults diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism will have standard bone density testing as well as an additional scan of the arm and leg using the Xtreme CT scanner. Fasting blood and urine samples will be obtained. This study involves one visit, and provides baseline information that can help us to screen for eligibility for the other research studies we are currently conducting.
PART B: For those patients who undergo parathyroid surgery, these tests are repeated at 1 month, 6 months and 1 year post-surgery to investigate changes that occur in the bones after cure of the disease.

To learn more about this study or if you are interested in participating, please contact our study coordinator at 212.305.7225 or visit: http://columbiamedicine.org/divisions/Endo/studies.html

Danusomab in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

Section: Metabolic Bone Disease Unit (Division of Endocrinology)
Lead Investigator: John Bilezikian, MD
Coordinator: Julia Udesky
Contact: 212.305.2900
Section: Metabolic Bone Disease Unit (Division of Endocrinology)
Description: Prior research suggests that RANKL, a molecule important in bone metabolism, responds to PTH, and that if RANKL is inactivated, PTH is shifted towards building bone. We will study the effect of Denosumab, a therapeutic agent that binds to and inactivates RANKL, in postmenopausal women with PHPT. The study will last two years, and subjects will be randomly assigned to receive either placebo or Denosumab for the first year of the study. In the second year, all subjects will receive Denosumab. Study procedures performed will include DXA, HR-pQCT scans, and assessments of biochemical markers of calcium metabolism and bone turnover using both blood and urine samples. Denosumab (60 mg) or placebo will be given every 6 months by an injection just under the skin. The study will involve 14 scheduled study visits. Nine of these visits occur during the first year of the study, the remaining four during the second year. To learn more about this study or if you are interested in participating, please contact our study coordinator at 212.305.7225 or visit: http://columbiamedicine.org/divisions/Endo/studies.html

Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency

Lead Investigator: Dr. Shonni Joy Silverberg
Coordinator: Anna Kepley
Contact: 212.342.5231; alk2186@columbia.edu
Section: Metabolic Bone Disease Unit (Division of Endocrinology)
Description: Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common disease that occurs in 1 in 10,000 people every year. In the presence of this condition, the parathyroid glands produce excessive amounts of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which regulates calcium levels. The high levels of parathyroid hormone remove too much calcium from bones, and then deposit the excess calcium in the blood, which is then filtered into the urine by the kidneys. Bone health is threatened by excess calcium loss which weakens bone structure. Other affected organs include the skeleton (calcium loss leads to a "weakening" of the skeleton), and the kidneys (high blood calcium can lead to kidney stones). It is now evident that many patients with even mild Primary Hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) are vitamin D deficient. Both PHPT and Vitamin D deficiency weakens bone. The purpose of this research study is to determine the effects Vitamin D levels have on the bones of patients with Primary Hyperparathyroidism. If you are interested in finding out more information, please contact our Study Coordinator.

Thyroid

We are currently not enrolling patients for thyroid-related research. Thank you for your interest.