Group News

At NYP/Columbia, general thoracic surgeon Frank D’Ovidio, MD, PhD, is collaborating with gastroentereologists David Markowitz, MD and Daniela Jodorkovsky, MD, to help patients with complex esophago-gastro-intestinal motility disorders. A wide range of services is now offered by a panel of experts at the Center for Motility and Neurogastroenterology, one of a few such programs in the nation.
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What's New in the Department of Surgery

B. Payne Stanifer, MD, MPH, Joins the Department of Surgery

B. Payne Stanifer, MD, MPH, joins the Department of Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Columbia University Medical Center as an Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery as of August 14, 2017. He completed his fellowship as the chief fellow in thoracic surgery at Northwestern University in Chicago, IL where he trained under Drs. Malcolm DeCamp and Patrick McCarthy in thoracic and cardiac surgery.
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What's New in the Department of Surgery

Columbia Launches Women’s Lung and Health Center

A growing number of non-smoking women, many of them young, contract lung cancer every year and are often diagnosed with an advanced stage malignancy. This fall, NYP/Columbia opened the Women’s Lung and Health Center, one of only two programs in the nation to serve this under-recognized patient population.
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As a new member of the PERT Consortium, inaugurated in 2015, NYP/Columbia is in the vanguard of treating pulmonary embolism with a rapid response, multidisciplinary team led by Philip Green, MD.
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What's New in the Department of Surgery

The 4th Annual ECMO Awareness Fundraiser

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What's New in the Department of Surgery

Immunotherapy as Neoadjuvant Therapy for Lung Cancer

Researchers at NYP/Columbia have recently launched an important trial of immunotherapy plus chemotherapy as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
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GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) now affects nearly 65 million Americans. Also called acid reflux or heartburn, GERD occurs when stomach contents back up into the esophagus. Untreated, it can lead to Barrett’s esophagus, a dangerous precancerous condition. Most people with GERD can be effectively treated using acid-blocking medication, but nearly a third continue to have symptoms.
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What's New in the Department of Surgery

Platinum Center of Excellence Celebration

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