News

The emerging field of interventional endocrinology has the potential to revolutionize the way we treat thyroid diseases. In this interview, thyroid surgeon Jennifer Kuo, MD, discusses new non-surgical techniques that are changing treatment.
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There is a critical need for better collaboration and care between healthcare providers, community leaders, and the public, in order to tackle these issues and reduce cancer through prevention, education, and access.
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We followed breast surgeon Dr. Roshni Rao for the day, and we learned about one of the most important skills a doctor can have: how to talk to patients about cancer.
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Blog & Newsletter

What We’re Reading: 09/13/19

A few highlights from around the web that made it into our feeds this week.
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Blog & Newsletter

What We’re Reading: 09/06/19

A few highlights from around the web that made it into our feeds this week.
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What's New in the Department of Surgery

Spotlight on Interns 2018-2019

A diverse group of international and national MD graduates join the Department of Surgery’s General Residency Program in 2018.
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What's New in the Department of Surgery

JJSS Welcomes Our 2019 Graduates

Each year the Society welcomes new graduates from the Department of Surgery’s training programs (general residency, cardiothoracic residency, plastic and reconstructive residency, as well as fellows graduating from Breast, GI/Endo, Pediatric, Transplantation and Vascular Fellowships) with a letter from the President and a gift from the Department of “A Proud Heritage: An Informal History of Surgery at Columbia”. Some graduates return to join the Columbia faculty while others spread their talents across the US.
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Blog & Newsletter

What We’re Reading: 8/30/19

A few highlights from around the web that made it into our feeds this week.
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A recent study shows one-third of all clinical trials that led to government-approved cancer drugs in the last decade didn’t report on race.
Many clinical trials don’t account for racial diversity, yet they are still used to determine FDA approvals for new cancer drugs. A recent study shows one-third of all clinical trials that led to government-approved cancer drugs in the last decade didn’t report on race.
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